History

The History department seeks to accomplish several things through its required three-year curriculum. The first of these is to provide students with not only a firm foundation in the facts of both global and U.S. history, but also the skills to analyze those facts and to place them into historical context. The second goal is to foster a deeper interest in specific historical topics so that students can take advantage of the wide range of elective classes offered by our teachers. Thirdly, and specifically in regard to U.S. history, the department is committed to providing a global perspective so that students can appreciate the inter-connectivity of our world today. Collectively, these three goals help to shape a fourth goal that is also linked to the broader mission of the school. The History department seeks to create informed, conscientious, and responsible citizens who understand the specific nature in which the past has influenced the world in which we currently live.

HISTORY DEPARTMENT

(430A) Advanced Placement American History

A two-semester course, which is the equivalent of a college freshman survey course. The purpose of the course is to prepare students for the AP exam given in May. This requires a comprehensive factual and analytical knowledge of American History from the colonial period into the twenty first century. It also requires the ability to write a coherent critical essay. Thus, the course demands are extensive with regard to both reading and writing. Each student is required to take the AP Exam to satisfy the course requirements. Admission is by special application. (5 Credits)

(421A) Advanced Placement World History

The focus of the AP World History course is the examination of the major events and the historical themes which have shaped the Modern World from approximately 2,000 BCE through the 20thcentury. Presented in a global perspective, the student will be required to think and write analytically. The use of  a textbook, research assignments, and ancillary readings  at the college level requires the student to master advanced reading and writing skills. Each student is required to take the AP World History Exam to satisfy the course requirements. Admission is by special application. (5 Credits)

(420S) United States History I

This two-semester course surveys American History from the Age of Exploration and the Colonial Era to the beginning of the Gilded Age. In addition to learning about the important events, issues, and individuals of this period, emphasis is placed on developing the student’s critical and analytical abilities regarding the historical process, including how to conduct research and write formal papers. (5 Credits)

(420H) United States History I - Honors

This two-semester course surveys American History from the Age of Exploration and the Colonial Era to the beginning of the Gilded Age.  In addition to learning about the important events, issues, and individuals of this period, emphasis is placed on developing the student’s critical and analytical abilities regarding the historical process, including how to conduct research and write formal papers. (5 Credits)

(420A) Advanced Placement Human Geography

This is a college-level course in which students will master the fundamental concepts in Human Geography, which studies the interaction between humans and their environment. Topics covered include: Geography—Its Nature and Perspectives, Population, Cultural Patterns and Processes, Political Organization of Space, Agriculture and Rural Land Use, Industrialization and Economic Development, and Cities and Urban Land Use. The students will develop critical thinking skills, which include analyzing and synthesizing geographic information as well as applying theoretical models to real-world case studies. Each student is required to take the AP Exam to satisfy the course requirements. Admission is by special application. (5 Credits)

(410S) World History

This course in World History presents the students with the principal movements in the development of man and nations. A greater emphasis is devoted to Europe than to Asia and Africa. The students are exercised in the skills of reading, writing, geography and the meaning of History for their own and future times. (5 Credits)

(410H) World History - Honors

Honors World History serves as an introduction into the Honors Program in the Social Studies Department. It is designed to challenge the more advanced student with a more comprehensive analysis of the significant events, movements, and ideologies that comprise the rise of civilization through the twentieth century. The course emphasizes the development of critical interpretive and written skills as well as the analysis of more advanced historical sources. Admission is based upon the placement exam and the recommendation of the Department Chairperson. (5 Credits)

(432H) United States History II - Honors

U.S. History II Honors is a continuation of the intensive examination of the salient events, movements and schools of historical inquiry begun in U.S. History I Honors.  As such, the course requires challenging critical investigation into American History from the Gilded Age through the nation’s emergence as a superpower in the post-war world into the present. The student will analyze the causes and effects of significant events (i.e. New Deal, New Freedom and Cold War) as well as the historical debates relevant to the period through substantial primary readings, interpretative essays, and seminar discussions.  Consequently, the course demands excellent reading and writing skills. (5 Credits)

(432S) United States History II

United States History II course is a survey course which encompasses the development of the American Nation from the beginning of the Gilded Age to current political, social, economic and cultural American affairs. Emphasis will be placed upon America’s role in foreign and domestic policy and the development of the country’s industrial and social experience. Students will be required to complete a research project (oral or written) during the second semester that will enhance the students’ research, analytical, and argumentative, skills. Major topics include World War I, World War II, the Cold War, the Korean Conflict, the Vietnam War and contemporary foreign and domestic political issues. Primary and secondary document analysis will be used on a regular basis to facilitate lectures. (5 Credits)

(440A) Advanced Placement European History

This is a two-semester college level course in which the students are required to demonstrate a knowledge of basic chronology and the major events and trends from approximately 1450, the High Renaissance, through the post Cold War period. In addition, the students will develop an ability to analyze, interpret and synthesize historical evidence. Each student is required to take the AP Exam to satisfy the course requirements. Admission is by special application. (5 Credits)

(441A) Advanced Placement Psychology

AP Psychology is a full-year college level course designed to introduce students to the scientific study of human behavior and mental processes. Along with preparation for the AP Psychology exam, the goals of this course are to immerse students in modern psychological investigation techniques, to accentuate the ethics and morality of human and animal research, and to emphasize scientific critical thinking skills in application to the social sciences. This course highlights psychology as a diverse social and biological science with multiple perspectives and interpretations.Each student is required to take the AP Exam to satisfy the course requirements. Admission is by special application. (5 Credits)

(441H) Psychology – Honors

Honors Psychology is an introductory study of the human mind and human behavior, which focuses on the fundamental facts and principles of psychology within the broader context of contemporary personal and social concerns. Topics may include the historical development of the discipline, scientific methodology, human development, motivational theory, consciousness, sensation and perception, learning, thinking, memory, emotions, exploring the brain, personality theory, social psychology, and abnormal psychology. (5 Credits)

(441S) Psychology

This is a one-semester course which will give the college-bound students a solid introduction to many of the topics that will be encountered in college psychology courses.  Psychology attempts to explain the “why” of our individual behavior and development. The course will help students become knowledgeable about principles and theories of modern psychology. The course will include small group interaction, and presentation of media that depict psychological behavior.  Students will be required to complete a research project on a psychological condition and present their work to the class.  Students will also learn how to properly utilize psychological journals to complete various assignments throughout the semester. Traditional methods of assessment will also be used to monitor the students’ level of comprehension of classroom material. (2.5 Credits)

(443A) Advanced Placement Economics

Advanced Placement Economics is a full-year course designed to provide the accelerated student with a college-level survey of macro and micro economics and prepare him for the AP exam given in May. The student will be expected to analyze economic models and theories as well as to demonstrate mastery of salient economic concepts and topics including fiscal policy, performance measures, and the demands of market economies. The course also requires the ability to read critically and to write a coherent interpretative essay. Each student is required to take the AP Exam to satisfy the course requirements. Admission is by special application. (5 Credits)

(445H) American Government

This one-semester course will explore the major themes in American Government today. The two great questions about politics: “Who governs?” and “To what ends?” will be a central focus throughout the course. Major topics explored will be: the Constitution, Federalism, the American political culture, political parties, the Presidency, public opinion, elections and campaigns, and the policy-making process. (2.5 Credits)

(446H) International Relations

This course offers an introductory survey of major topics in, and approaches to the study of, international relations. The readings explore how scholars in the field have sought to engage important questions, such as why international cooperation on economic issues is so difficult, and why states sometimes go to war. The last part of the course applies the theories explored in the first two sections to current and emerging challenges—namely global health challenges and climate change. Analytical writing, research and class discussion are critical components to this course. (5 Credits)

(447S) Twentieth-Century History

The course is directed toward the examination of the social, economic and political changes that have occurred throughout the Twentieth Century. Through the use of books and movies, the student will examine the specific events that have shaped the world over the course of this century of change. Some of the events that will be closely examined include: the First World War, the Second World War, the Cold War, and the collapse of the Iron Curtain. Each event will be studied from an American, European and Far-Eastern perspective and will provide the student with a well-rounded look at the events that have shaped the world in which they live. (2.5 Credits)

(448S) The Civil War (1861-1865)

A single semester course that will study the main causes of our Civil War. Personalities of the time period and events that led up to the war will be covered in great detail. A strong emphasis will be placed on the military strategy and tactics of this great conflict. (2.5 Credits)

(449A) Advanced Placement Art History

This course aims to prepare students for the AP Art History Exam and provide students the equivalent of an introductory college course in the history of world art. The course covers the major developments in art, history, and works of art from the Paleolithic Era to contemporary 21st century. The main emphasis is on Western Art with some emphasis on the art, culture, religion and traditions of non-Western societies. Integrated into the course are required visits to New York and Philadelphia museums. No previous art experience is required. Each student is required to take the AP Exam to satisfy the course requirements. Admission is by special application. (5 Credits)

(450S) Ancient America

This course will examine the history of the original inhabitants of the Americas.  The course will focus primarily on the largest and most significant civilizations — the Maya, Aztec, and Inca — but it will also examine several earlier societies that influenced these important groups.  Some class time will also be dedicated to the several of the groups that lived in what is today the United States.  The course will also examine the initial stages of European conquest as well as the status of Native American people throughout the continents today.

(452S) U.S./ Latin American Relations

This course will examine the history of relations between the United States and Latin America.  It will focus on several of the most important historical periods as well as some of the countries with which we have had the most important relationships.  The course will be divided into several sections — U.S./ Mexican relations; U.S./ Cuba relations; Latin America and the Cold War; Puerto Rico; immigration; drug trafficking; as well as one selected by the class.  The goal of the course is to provide students with a broad overview of the history between our country and some of its closest neighbors.

(640H) Economics – Honors

Honors Economics will offer an in depth analysis of Macroeconomic principles, achieved with a mixture of macro theory and real-world application. This is a full-year course designed to introduce the student to important fundamental economic topics such as Economic Growth, the concepts of Supply and Demand, Unemployment, Inflation, Money and Banking, Fiscal Policy and International Economics. (5 Credits)

(640S) Introduction to Business

This course provides a study of the role of business in our economic system and analyzes the changes occurring in business today. Topics explored in this course include basic economic principles, the world of finance and investment, accounting, government and taxes, and the impact of computers on all aspects of business. (5 Credits)

FACULTY

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Brother Tim Ahern FSC
Work Phone: (732) 747-1959 Ext 119
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Brother Thomas Carney FSC
Work Phone: (732) 747-1959 Ext 336
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Ms. Cathleen Carroll
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Dr. John Gustavsen
Work Phone: (732) 747-1959 Ext 318
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Mr. Michael Mazzaccaro
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Mr. Patrick McGann
Work Phone: (732) 747-1959 Ext 214
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Mrs. Victoria Meehan
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Mr. David Santos
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Mr. R. Courter Smith
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Mrs. Maureen Szablewski
Work Phone: (732) 747-1959 Ext 101
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Mr. Matthew Wester